Rhododendron


For some parts of the country winter is long gone and evidence of spring is everywhere you look. But for Northern states winter can drag and won’t halt its killing chill just because the calendar says so.  This nifty guide will help take care of your garden in unpredictable weather and prevent a late winter storm from decimating your new growth.

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Our Favorite Nodding Flowers

Our Favorite Nodding Flowers


Posted on Mar 3, 2017 | 0 comments

Not all flowers are like daisies with their blooms facing up to meet the sun. In fact, some are more shy, with bowed heads studying their roots.  Downward facing and lovely, these demure cultivars have earned a special place in our hearts and our gardens.

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Creating a Master’s Garden

Creating a Master’s Garden


Posted on Mar 29, 2016 | 0 comments

Since 1934, The Masters Tournament has been held annually at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. Trust us, this is not your average golf club. Augusta National is known for its stunning landscapes and gardens, providing a beautiful view for the many golfers and their audience. The founders even named each hole after one of the plants that can be found there.

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Ghastly Beauties

Ghastly Beauties


Posted on Nov 11, 2015 | 0 comments

Ghouls and Goblins won’t kill you. But these plants could.

Many of the garden plants we grow for ornamental reasons got their vibrant, exotic colors as nature’s way of saying “Warning—Poison!” While most of these are innocuous enough sitting in pots or in the garden, if ingested they could cause illness of varying severity, and sometimes even death.

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One of the numerous negative ecological effects of urban development is a higher rate of soil erosion. Forests naturally hold on to soil with their roots. Trees slow the fall of raindrops to keep them from disrupting the soil. The natural bumps and hillocks in the landscape break up the flow of water, giving it more opportunity to be absorbed by plant roots and filtered through the soil before it winds its way into creeks, streams, and rivers. These natural soil-defense mechanisms do not exist in developed land, where rain falls on rooftops, asphalt, and flat lawns covered in relatively sparse, shallow-rooted plants. All this means that on developed land, wind and rain carries off much more top soil, dumping it into storm drains and into the water table. This not only degrades the soil quality, but also dumps soil into the local water supply, along with oils and often-toxic pollutants.

For the sustained health of your garden and your community, you should try and minimize erosion and runoff as much as possible with careful garden design. Where downspouts empty onto your yard or where storm waters flow through it, you should take every effort to absorb and filter this water. A well-designed garden will capture water effectively, keeping plant roots moist much longer while also holding on to the soil’s nutrients and keeping pollution out of the local water table.

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An orange-inspired garden design with purple accents.

Click here to see the Pinterest board of the best orange varieties!

We’ve all got our favorite color, that one that just seems to “pop” for us more than all the others. For me, that color is orange; nothing seems quite so vibrant as a bright orange bloom on a sunny day. Whenever I come across a particularly beautiful orange specimen, I just think about how good it would look in a whole orange arrangement. That’s why I put together this garden design to serve as a planner for myself and the other orange-aholics out there.

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