Supplies


Do you ever look out at your garden and wish you had a fairy godmother (or at least her magic wand) to whisk away your planting pains? Espoma isn’t magic, but its products have an astounding effectiveness which is as close to bibbity-bobbity-boo as we’ve ever experienced. They’re a trusted name for a reason and now it’s time to see why.

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My Fair Ladybugs

My Fair Ladybugs


Posted on Apr 26, 2016 | 0 comments

They land on our finger tips, scurry across our dashboards and even find their way between the pages of our books. That’s right; the season of ladybugs is upon us. Fear not – they’re here to help!

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Raise a Rooftop Garden

Raise a Rooftop Garden


Posted on Mar 23, 2016 | 0 comments

City life has its perks, but what of the gardeners stuck in the steel jungle? When there’s not enough open land to sooth the itch in your green thumb, it’s time to start looking up. Rooftop gardens are the next best thing to the ground level lawns of the suburbs. They take time and creativity, of course, but what garden doesn’t?

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(Note: This is Part 3 in a series. First you should read Part 1 and Part 2).

If your problem is not too much rain, but too little, again we can look to nature for solutions. In nature you don’t see lush tropical plants trying to grow in the desert. Rather, the flora follows the climate, with plants growing only as full and lush as the local water sources allow. We can learn from nature’s wisdom by adapting our gardens to suit our climate and by making good use of every raindrop the sky gives us! We can mimic the water cycle by carefully conserving and re-using our water supplies. We can mimic deserts and prairies by landscaping with drought-tolerant native species rather than “thirsty” turfgrass and ornamentals. And for those of us that are really ambitious, we can mimic the way that forest landscapes hold onto rain by utilizing techniques like Hugelkultur and swales.

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Gardening In A Drought

Drought can be one of the most disappointing things to happen to a gardener. You work all year long, growing beautiful plants, and your yard looks exactly how you want it to look. All of it can be taken away in just a few dry weeks in August. There are a few things you can do to give your garden the best chance of pulling through.

  1. When it starts to get dry cut back on the fertilizer or stop completely.
    Your plants do not need to be trying to grow right now, they need to be focusing on survival. Fertilizer stimulates growth and moisture intake.
  2. Aerate your soil in the spring.
    This will allow roots to access moisture and nutrients more readily, giving your plants a big jump on the drier months to come.
  3. Water longer but less frequently.
    Water deep into the soil, train your roots to grow down to where the soil holds moisture. Shallow root systems will dry out very quickly.
  4. Water in the morning.
    Water your garden before 9am, earlier if you can manage. Later in the day your moisture is more likely to evaporate before your plants have a chance to soak it up.

If you live in an area that is prone to dry weather take a look at Wayside Gardens' diverse line of drought tolerant plants. You may also want to check your local nursery for native plants that are more adept in your climate.

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