Wayside Gardens Voices


Community gardens are just fun, weekend projects that are great for a light workout but not much else, right? Wrong! Gardening has a huge impact on the local environment, businesses and nature as a whole. Some of you already tend a personal garden, but perhaps you would like to get more involved in the community to lend your valuable experience and wisdom to local projects. This is your chance to start something amazing!

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Growing a Rabbit-proof Garden

Growing a Rabbit-proof Garden


Posted on Jun 12, 2017 | 0 comments

They’re cute, they’re soft, and to many gardeners they are a menace. Rabbits can clear a garden of foliage, flowers and fruit in a single night, making them some of the sneakiest and most destructive forces nature has in her arsenal. While there are many ways to fend off this cotton-tailed threat the effectiveness of each method depends on the situation. Just try a little of everything and see what works for you!

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Our Longest-Blooming Flowers

Our Longest-Blooming Flowers


Posted on May 11, 2017 | 0 comments

We dedicate so much time and energy to our gardens that it is only natural to want to get the most out of it. An easy way to ensure returns on our hard work is by growing plants with long seasons of appeal. Each of these plant varieties are known to feature long-blooming flowers for maximum beauty for months on end.

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Why the Windmill?


Posted on May 10, 2017 | 0 comments

If you’ve been with us for a while, you had to have asked yourself at least once, “What’s with the windmill?” It’s true that we’ve gone against the norm here. Most gardening companies stick to the obvious choices of using flowers, green leaves or even a tomato as their signature. These are all well and good and certainly get the point across. So why does Wayside have a windmill?

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35278_5For the average gardener, there would be no garden without full sun perennials. They provide most of the colors, textures, and fragrances that serve to give a garden its basic structure. From spring to fall, these are your staples– just fill in along the way with a few annuals, tropicals, and short bloomers.

That being said, full sun perennials will also require the bulk of your attention. Full sun perennials will respond positively to regular maintenance. You will need to prune in late winter and spring, deadhead your blooms, and divide your plants when the growth becomes to dense. They also love soils with high organic matter content and good mulch.

Caring for full sun perennials may be taxing, but you will appreciate your garden when the work is done. Check out all the sun perennials from Wayside!

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Garden Party Essentials

Garden Party Essentials


Posted on Apr 24, 2017 | 0 comments

Who doesn’t like a good party? The days are getting longer and warmer, so it’s time to get out and get social! There are plenty of easy ways to make your gatherings memorable, and with these tips and tools it won’t be long before you’ve mastered the art of the garden party.

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Here at Wayside Gardens, we always appreciate being mentioned by newspapers.  I especially enjoyed this article in the San Francisco Chronicle, because it recommended us as a source for trumpet vines.  I’m a great lover of flowering vines, so that put a big smile on my face.  I suspect that my love for flowering vines comes from growing up looking forward each year to the Wisteria blooming all over town.  Every spring pine groves all over town explode into purple, and the purple flowers hang thick on almost every tree up and down the older streets.  They stick around for much of the summer, but here Wisteria and Daffodils mean spring has arrived, and all the flowers of the season will be following soon behind.

As I’ve grown older, though, I’ve grown to love all sorts of flowering vines.  The hummingbirds love my trumpet vine (a Campsis ‘Mme. Galen’) that’s happily climbing a sunny wall at my mother’s house, and I’ve been lovingly tending some pink rose vines on an arching lattice for years now.  v1661

Over the years I’ve had several Clematis vines (it’s almost an addiction, with so much variety of both color and shape), but I think that my current favorite is my Clematis Bourbon.  My sister loves to steal my flowers and float them in a crystal bowl of water as a centerpiece.  Fortunately, it produces so many flowers throughout the summer that I don’t mind.  Even after years of propagating flowering vines, though, I still get a thrill each year when I first spot those wonderful amethyst Wisteria vines for the first time, and it’s still my favorite vine by far.

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We’ve all heard the saying “Don’t judge a book by its cover” and that is sound advice even when applied in the horticultural world. These beautiful yet unfortunate specimens were stuck with silly, weird, or just plain ugly names, but that doesn’t keep them from making us smile. After all, a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, right?

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